How radon is removed from Homes

The most common method for removing radon from homes (radon mitigation, radon repair or radon reduction) is active soil depressurization. We have used this type of system on homes ranging from multiple crawl space homes built in the 1800’s up to working with builders on brand new construction.
For homes with a single crawl space, multiple crawl spaces or a combination of concrete slab and crawl space we dig a trench in the crawl space and bury a slotted pipe that will be the suction pipe for that area. We then install a vapor barrier over this pipe and seal it to the walls and seal around any posts or support beams. The pipe is then routed to connect with other suction points and a single pipe routes to either the exterior or the attic. The radon fan is attached and the pipe is discharged per EPA regulations.
For homes with a concrete slab, a 4 inch hole is drilled through the foundation somewhere close to the footer (about 6-8 inches off the foundation wall). The pipe then routes to the exterior or to the attic where the fan is mounted and discharged per EPA regulations.
On any type of radon mitigation system it is very important to seal the sump pit or any other significant radon entry points in the basement or crawl space. This allows the vacuum to pull air from under the slab or vapor barrier without pulling conditioned air out of the home that the homeowner has paid to heat or cool.
The most common method for removing radon from homes (radon mitigation, radon repair or radon reduction) is active soil depressurization. We have used this type of system on homes ranging from multiple crawl space homes built in the 1800’s up to working with builders on brand new construction.
For homes with a single crawl space, multiple crawl spaces or a combination of concrete slab and crawl space we dig a trench in the crawl space and bury a slotted pipe that will be the suction pipe for that area. We then install a vapor barrier over this pipe and seal it to the walls and seal around any posts or support beams. The pipe is then routed to connect with other suction points and a single pipe routes to either the exterior or the attic. The radon fan is attached and the pipe is discharged per EPA regulations.
For homes with a concrete slab, a 4 inch hole is drilled through the foundation somewhere close to the footer (about 6-8 inches off the foundation wall). The pipe then routes to the exterior or to the attic where the fan is mounted and discharged per EPA regulations.
On any type of radon mitigation system it is very important to seal the sump pit or any other significant radon entry points in the basement or crawl space. This allows the vacuum to pull air from under the slab or vapor barrier without pulling conditioned air out of the home that the homeowner has paid to heat or cool.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

  • googlecd10d03e1a5ebd4e.html

%d bloggers like this: